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Via Ganaceto

La Guida di Modena

Via Ganaceto

 

From Via Emilia Centro to Viale Monte Kosica
 

The long, straight street, laid at the time of the so-called ‘addizione erculea’ which enlarged the city to the north (first half of the XVI century), was renewed by Francesco III from 1772. Leaving behind the via Emilia°°, the street crosses via del Taglio, lively with shops and bars. On the left, Piazza della Pomposa°. At number 93, the place where the great mathematician Paolo Ruffini died in 1822 (the inventor of the rule to decompose polynoms).
At number 95 casa Luigini, a medieval-Venetian style of the early XX century. The imposing Palazzo Moreni-Giacobazzi (XVIII century) has housed for years the Ursuline nuns and a secondary school.
After the corssroads with corso Cavour, on the right, palazzo Molza (number 134). Here, in this sober one storey palace, incredibly rich decorated in the interior, Giuseppe Garibaldi lived for three months, from 17 august to 13 november 1859.
On the left (number 121), Palazzo Campori, a huge edifice with a big courtyard, once held the art collection of the Marchese, now on show in the Musei Civici°°. Many famous guests have been given hospitality here: from Napoleon to Cosimo III de’ Medici, from Frederick IV of Denmark to The Kings of Italy Vittorio Emanuele II and Umberto I.
At the end of the street, on the left, the church of the Capuchin friars with the annexed monastery, invited into the town in 1565 by the great Cardinal Giovanni Morone.